Start Your FREE Membership NOW
 Discover Proven Ways to Be a Better Law Office Manager
 Get Our Weekly eNewsletter, Law Office Manager Bulletin,
    and MUCH MORE
 Absolutely NO Risk or Obligation on Your Part -- It's FREE!
EMAIL ADDRESS



Upgrade to Premium Membership NOW for Just $90!
Get 3 Months of Full Premium Membership Access
Includes Our Monthly Newsletter, Office Toolbox, Policy Center, and Archives
And MUCH MORE!
MANAGING STAFF

Model Policy: Reduced schedule and flexible work arrangements

Why you need this policy:

Once upon a time, the belief was that an individual could be an attorney or a primary caregiving parent but not both. Attitudes—and laws—have changed this thinking and opened the door to all kinds of flexible work arrangements allowing attorneys to balance their professional and parental obligations.

. . . download here

WORKPLACE SAFETY

Model Policy: Sexual harassment

Why you need this policy:

Personnel issues are among the most difficult problems faced by law office managers. And few personnel issues are any more difficult than sexual harassment.

. . . download here

RECORDKEEPING

Keeping the records long enough . . . but not too long

Do you know how long you are required to keep the firm’s tax records? How about any reports of on-the-job injuries? And what about e-mails? Here’s a summary of what you need to keep and for how long.
Record retention raises questions in almost all offices. And because of the uncertainty, offices tend to hang onto records far too long, says attorney and record management expert Donald S. Skupsky, JD, CRM.
Skupsky is president and CEO of Information Requirements Clearinghouse in Denver, which provides consulting services as well as software and publications on the legal requirements of recordkeeping. Here he outlines what to keep and for…

. . . read more

MANAGING THE OFFICE

Same-sex marriage brings new employee issues

Though it applies only to states where same-sex marriage is legal, the Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage warrants attention from administrators in all states.
For those in Washington, DC, and the 13 states where gay marriage is recognized, there are new employment law requirements.
For those in all the other states, the ruling calls for increased emphasis on nondiscrimination.
A matter of two rulings
In a nutshell, the decision, which came down June 26, 2013, said that in states where same-sex marriage is legally recognized, gay couples who are…

. . . read more

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Health reform’s delay on employer mandate raises lots of questions

Do you understand how the employer mandate of the Affordable Care Act affects your business? Here’s a quick look at the mandate.
There’s a new delay in health care reform.
It’s a one-year postponement of what’s known as the employer mandate of the Affordable Care Act.
That mandate says large employers, or those with 50 or more full-time employees, have to provide health insurance for their employees or pay a penalty. Originally, the requirement was supposed to take effect this coming January. Now the date is pushed back to…

. . . read more

COMPLIANCE

Two ADA surprises: odd disabilities and legal fees that can hit the sky

First, what the firm may not think is a disability could well be one.
Second, the ADA applies to access to public places such as stores and restaurants – and law offices. And while it “has a noble purpose,” along the way “it’s been hijacked by a subset of plaintiffs who have made it their life’s work to target as many public accommodations as possible for monetary gain,” says James S. O’brien, Jr., a partner with Pryor Cashman in New York.
Watch out.
You mean that’s a disability?
The ADA can get confusing for employers, because there’s no bright line on what constitutes a disability, O’Brien…

. . . read more

RISK MANAGEMENT

Malpractice claims are on the rise, and here’s why

The threat of malpractice looms larger now than when the country’s financial picture was less gloomy.
The poor economy is bringing more and different types of suits, says one malpractice insurance carrier.
It’s due to several reasons, starting with the fact that attorneys are accepting work today that in better times they would have turned down.
Swimming in unknown waters
Taking on work outside the firm’s experience and legal competence is a tremendous claim cause, says Vernon Barclay, founder of the Thaxton Barclay Group, a Tampa professional liability insurance provider.
Yet with business slow and competition high, attorneys are doing exactly…

. . . read more

COMPLIANCE

An ever changing policy on using social media

“The reality is that people are going to use social media.”
So more than two years ago, the 65-attorney firm of Meyer, Suozzi, English & Klein took the position “that we were going to be tuned in to social media to promote business development,” says Frederick J. Esposito, Jr.,CLM, CFO and director of administration at the firm’s New York City office.
And with that decision came the task of setting standards for using it.
At that time, there were very few guides for the firm to follow, he says. The only applicable information was the rules of ethics regarding advertising. So he researched the benefits and risks of social media, gave a seminar on the findings to the attorneys, and began to develop the…

. . . read more

COMPLIANCE

Beware Lilly Ledbetter; it extends the time limit for unfair pay claims

A relatively new law that all but eliminates the statute of limitations on equal pay lawsuits for women brings yet more employment law concerns administrators need to be aware of.
It’s the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.
Employers can expect an upswing in claims that their female employees are underpaid, says Denise Murphy, an employment law attorney with Rubin and Rudman in Boston.
And not always without good reason, she notes. Recent statistics show that women make from 73 cents to 77 cents on the dollar compared to what men make, even when they have the same…
. . . read more

COMPLIANCE

Retaliation gets broader and more expensive and is hitting all offices

What’s the single greatest employment law risk employers are facing?
Retaliation. The EEOC reports that retaliation claims have been on the upswing for 10 years and now sit at the top of the list of employment law matters. Heightening the issue is the fact that an employee can cry retaliation – and the firm can have to pay out a lot of money – even if the complaint supposedly causing the retaliation is found to be groundless.
Almost all offices are at risk. While some types of retaliation claims are limited to employers with a certain number of employers, others apply to all employers, regardless of size, cautions attorneys and…

. . . read more


(-0)