Start Your FREE Membership NOW
 Discover Proven Ways to Be a Better Law Office Manager
 Get Our Weekly eNewsletter, Law Office Manager Bulletin,
    and MUCH MORE
 Absolutely NO Risk or Obligation on Your Part -- It's FREE!
EMAIL ADDRESS



Upgrade to Premium Membership NOW for Just $90!
Get 3 Months of Full Premium Membership Access
Includes Our Monthly Newsletter, Office Toolbox, Policy Center, and Archives
And MUCH MORE!
PARTNERSHIP PATTERNS

Study identifies generational similarities, differences in the workplace

The National Association for Law Placement, Inc. (NALP), in partnership with PP&C Consulting principals Aric Press and Yolanda Cartusciello, has released Multiple Generations in Law Firms: Working Together. The first-of-its-kind study provides insights into some of the generational dynamics at play in the current law firm work setting.

The survey gathered responses from 2,473 lawyers—1,394 partners and 1,079 associates during 2019. With members of the Baby Boomer, Gen X, and Millennial generations all working together in today’s law firms and popular culture providing so many tropes and stereotypes for each of these distinct generations, the study seeks to measure some of the similarities and differences in the opinions and attitudes held by partners and associates of a variety of ages.

The oldest members of the Millennial generation have become partners at major U.S. law firms. It turns out these new partners share most of the attitudes and habits of the partners they are replacing or joining. They prefer to work more often from home and they have a somewhat higher opinion of their associates than their elders express, but in terms of their commitment to their work, their overall satisfaction, and how closely their values align with their firms and clients, Millennial lawyers appear to be cut from the same patterns as their predecessors. Not surprisingly, perhaps, law firm lawyers from multiple generations are more similar than they are different, though some significant differences emerge.

“The most surprising finding to me, and certainly among the most important findings, is the finding that Black and Latinx associates are more likely than White associates to aspire to become partners at their current firms,” notes James G. Leipold, NALP’s Executive Director.

Another key finding is that most associates—59%—do not aspire to become partners at their current firm.

You can read the full report at www.nalp.org/generations.

Close

EMAIL ADDRESS


PASSWORD
EMAIL ADDRESS

FIRST NAME

LAST NAME

TITLE

COMPANY

PHONE

Try Premium Membership

(-0)